Europe’s migration crisis

Photo: Emre Tazegul/AP/Press Association Images

Photo: Emre Tazegul/AP/Press Association Images

As another boat capsized in the Mediterranean with tragic consequences, European countries struggled to get to grips with the biggest refugee crisis the continent has experienced since the Second World War. In issue #20 of Delayed Gratification, we traced how the drama unfolded through a timeline and infographics. These are four of the graphics we made for the feature.

Sea change

The number of migrants and refugees crossing the Mediterranean to Europe dramatically increased in 2015


Crossing continents

The routes into the EU taken by migrants and refugees from January to August 2015  compared with the same period in 2014



Visual impact

How photographs of Alan Kurdi got people talking about the crisis in the summer of 2015 – and how the terminology used shifted from migrants towards refugees



The crisis in context

Less than six percent of the Syrians forced from their homes between April 2011 and October 2015 have fled to Europe. Meanwhile, almost a third of Lebanon’s population now consists of Syrian refugees


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